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Much of this information, the data, the photos etc. comes directly from the veterans, the veterans' organizations and is the most accurate available anywhere..............much of this information is not even known elsewhere.

Scroll down to the U-Boat or U-Bootflottille and click on it - the history will open for you.  Note that names in all UPPER CASE and BOLD with a number following the name are Sharkhunters Members.  The first number is their Membership Number and the second is the year in which they joined Sharkhunters.
 

1st U-Bootflottille 2nd U-Bootflottille 3rd U-Bootflottille 4th U-Bootflottille 5th U-Bootflottille
         
6th U-Bootflottille 7th U-Bootflottille 8th U-Bootflottille 9th U-Bootflottille 10th U-Bootflottille
         
11th U-Bootflottille 12th U-Bootflottille 13th U-Bootflottille 14th U-Bootflottille 15th U-Bootflottille
         
16th U-Bootflottille 17th U-Bootflottille 18th U-Bootflottille 19th U-Bootflottille 20th U-Bootflottille
         
21st U-Bootflottille 22nd U-Bootflottille 23rd U-Bootflottille 24th U-Bootflottille 25th U-Bootflottille
         
26th U-Bootflottille 27th U-Bootflottille 28th U-Bootflottille 29th U-Bootflottille 30th U-Bootflottille
         
31st U-Bootflottille 32nd U-Bootflottille      

Type I-A German U-Boat
              
Actually, this is a misnomer because the first of a U-Boat type did not have the "A" after it.  The Type I was merely the Type I, and only two were made because this just was not a very good submarine.  The crews did not like their unpredictable handling - they would surface or dive almost on their own.  U-25 and U-26 were the only two Type I German U-Boats ever made.  The Type I was a twin shaft diesel-electric sea going submarine with relatively long range and it was based on the GUR that Germany had previously built for the Turkish Navy.  The Type I carried fourteen torpedoes.

Displacement:    862/983 tons Length:                  237' 6" Beam:                    20' 3" Draft:                   14' 0"
Power (diesel):    2,800hp Power (electric):  1,000hp Speed (diesel):    18 knots Speed (electric):  8.5 knots
Bunkers:   96 tons diesel fuel Range (diesel):  6,700 miles @ 12 knots Range (electric):   78 miles @ 4 knots Crew:   32 men
Deck gun:   single 4 inch AA guns:    single 20mm Tubes (fwd):  four Tubes (aft):   two

FREE SAMPLE MAGAZINE - Sharkhunters Members get all this information and a whole lot more including a monthly Magazine with facts, veteran's memories and stories you cannot get anywhere else - and when you join, you may select one of our hand-signed photos of veterans of the war as your free gift.  Send us an email at sharkhunters@earthlink.net with your name and request a FREE sample of our KTB Magazine.  You will love it - and there is NO obligation!

NOTE - Sharkhunters Member's names appear in bold capital letters followed by their Membership Number.

U-1 U-2 U-3 U-4 U-5 U-6 U-7 U-8 U-9 U-10
                   
U-11 U-12 U-13 U-14 U-15 U-16 U-17 U-18 U-19 U-20

Click on our emblem here to see all the benefits of Membership including a FREE photo that has been hand-signed by the veteran.  Almost 100 veterans, all Sharkhunters Members, hand-signed 100 each of their photos for us to give to new Members.  Most of these are not available anywhere else in the world.  Don't miss your opportunity - join now.
     U-Boat histories being added daily.  (please check back frequently)

U-21 U-22 U-23 U-24 U-25 U-26 U-27 U-28 U-29 U-30
                   
U-31 U-32                

Type II-A German U-Boat

Remember, this is a misnomer because the first of a U-Boat type did not have the "A" after it.  The Type II was merely the Type II, and they were used mainly as training submarines because of their very short range.  This was the first of the 'dugout canoes' as their crews called them.  This Type was based on the German UB II boats of World War One and the Finnish VESIKKO.  Only six were built, U-1 through U-6.  The Type II-A was a twin shaft diesel-electric submarine of rather short range.  The Type II-A carried six torpedoes or eight mines.

Displacement:    254/303 tons Length:                  134' 3" Beam:                    13' 6" Draft:                   12' 6"
Power (diesel):       700hp Power (electric):     360hp Speed (diesel):     13 knots Speed (electric):  7 knots
Bunkers:   12 tons diesel fuel Range (diesel):  1,050 miles @ 12 knots Range (electric):   35 miles @ 4 knots Crew:   25 men
Deck gun:   None AA guns:    single 20mm  * Tubes (fwd):  three Tubes (aft):   None

           *  NOTE - AA armament was increased to twin 20mm when operationally deployed

              U-48    
                   
                   

Type II-B German U-Boat

The Type II-B was a slightly improved version of the original 'dugout canoe' primarily with increased bunkers and radius.  Only a handful were built; U-7 through U-24 plus U-120 and U-121.  They were used mainly for training.  The Type II-B carried six torpedoes or eight mines.

   
Displacement:    279/329 tons Length:                  140' 0" Beam:                    13' 6" Draft:                   12' 9"
Power (diesel):       700hp Power (electric):     360hp Speed (diesel):     13 knots Speed (electric):  7 knots
Bunkers:   21 tons diesel fuel Range (diesel):  1,300 miles @ 12 knots Range (electric):   43 miles @ 4 knots Crew:   25 men
Deck gun:   None AA guns:    single 20mm  * Tubes (fwd):  three Tubes (aft):   None

           *  NOTE - AA armament was increased to four (2 x 2) 20mm when operationally deployed.

U-120 and U-121 were being built for the Royal Yugoslavian Navy when war broke out, acquired by the Kriegsmarine.  Their conning towers were different that the other Type II-B boats; more similar to those on the Type II-D boats.

          U-66        
                   
                   

Type II-C German U-Boat

The Type II-C was a slightly improved version of the Type II-B with increased bunkers and radius plus slightly more powerful electric motors.  Only a handful were built; U-56 through U-63 and were used mainly for training.  The Type II-C carried six torpedoes or eight mines.

Displacement:    291/341 tons Length:                  144' 0" Beam:                    13' 9" Draft:                   12' 6"
Power (diesel):       700hp Power (electric):     410hp Speed (diesel):     12 knots Speed (electric):  7 knots
Bunkers:   23 tons diesel fuel Range (diesel):  1,900 miles @ 12 knots Range (electric):   43 miles @ 4 knots Crew:   25 men
Deck gun:   None AA guns:    single 20mm  * Tubes (fwd):  three Tubes (aft):   None

           *  NOTE - AA armament was increased to four (2 x 2) 20mm when operationally deployed.

                   
                   
          U-96        

Type II-D German U-Boat

The Type II-D was a improved again over the Type II-C - the main improvement was the addition of saddle tanks.  This increased the bunkers and radius a bit more.  A small number were built; U-137 through U-152 and after coastal patrols were used then for training.  The Type II-D carried six torpedoes or eight mines.

Displacement:    314/364 tons Length:                  144' 3" Beam:                    16' 0" Draft:                   12' 9"
Power (diesel):       700hp Power (electric):     410hp Speed (diesel):     12.75 knots Speed (electric):  7.25 knots
Bunkers:   38 tons diesel fuel Range (diesel):  3,500 miles @ 12 knots Range (electric):   56 miles @ 4 knots Crew:   25 men
Deck gun:   None AA guns:    single 20mm  * Tubes (fwd):  three Tubes (aft):   None

 

                   
                   
                   

Type III German U-Boat

      
This design was laid out in 1933 and it was basically similar to the Type I-A but with a large circular watertight hangar abaft the conning tower to carry two 10 ton MTBs.  The MTBs would be launched by flooding down the submarine until the decks were awash and the MTBs floated free then departed their hangar.  When their mission was completed, the MTBs would return, the U-Boat would surface, the MTBs would float into their hangars, watertight doors would be shut and the U-Boat would depart.  Since this would be a smooth water operation only, the design was abandoned.  No Type III German U-Boats were built - none even contracted for.

Displacement:   unknown Length:                  254' 3" Beam:                    26' 3" Draft:                   17' 0"
Power (diesel):   2,800hp Power (electric):   1,000hp Speed (diesel):     17 knots Speed (electric):  8 knots
Bunkers:   unknown Range (diesel):    unknown Range (electric):   unknown Crew:   65 men - includes
        the MTB crews
Deck gun:   single 4.1 inch AA guns:    none Tubes (fwd):  four Tubes (aft):   two

The Type III was planned to carry eight torpedoes and two MTBs.
 

                   
                   
                   

Type IV German U-Boat
The Type IV was a projected design that never got beyond the drawing board.  No further details are available and none were built.
 

                   
                   
                   


Type V German U-Boat
The Type V was a projected design that never got beyond the drawing board.  No further details are available and none were built.
 

                   
                   
                   


Type VI German U-Boat
The Type VI was a projected design that never got beyond the drawing board.  No further details are available and none were built.
 

                   
                   
                   

Type VII-A German U-Boat

The first of the Type VII boats were called VII-A.  These were sea going boats based on the Finnish VETEHINEN and built to get the greatest number of U-Boats built for the total overall tonnage limitations allowed by the London Naval Treaty.  The Kriegsmarine listed the Type VII boats as displacing 500 tons although they were much more than that.  The Type VII boats with all its variants were the most produced submarines ever in the history of naval warfare.

Only ten Type VII-A boats were built; U-27 through U-36.  Six of them were sunk before the war was a year old.  The Type VII-A carried eleven torpedoes, some stowed externally.

Displacement:    626/745 tons Length:                  211' 9" Beam:                    19' 3" Draft:                   14' 6"
Power (diesel):    2,100 hp Power (electric):    750 hp Speed (diesel):     16 knots  * Speed (electric):  8 knots
Bunkers:   67 tons diesel fuel Range (diesel):  4,300 miles @ 12 knots Range (electric):   90 miles @ 4 knots Crew:   44 men **
Deck gun:   single 3.5 inch AA guns:    single 20mm Tubes (fwd):  four Tubes (aft):   one  ***

   *  With saddle tanks empty, speed increased to 17 knots.
  **  Crew complement varied up to perhaps 60 depending on the mission.
 ***  What set the "A" variant apart from all other Type VII variants was the stern tube.  On the "A" variant, the stern tube was above the waterline.  All others had the stern tube below the waterline.

                   
                   
                   

Type VII-B German U-Boat

       
The Type VII-B was slightly enlarged over the initial variant and the saddle tanks were modified to improve seaworthiness as well as extend bunker capacity and range.  More powerful diesels were installed for greater surface speed.

More VII-B boats were built than the initial variant, but still not so many.  They were U-45 through U-55; U-73 through U-76; U-83 through U-87 and U-99 through U-102.  The three top ACES of the early years drove Type VII-B boats.  All three were sunk early in the war - Prien on 7 March 1941 then Schepke and KRETSCHMER within hours of one another on 17 March 1941.

Günther Prien  U-47 KRETSCHMER (122-1985)  U-99 Joachim Schepke   U-100
Displacement:    753/857 tons Length:                  218' 3" Beam:                    20' 3" Draft:                   15' 6"
Power (diesel):    2,800 hp Power (electric):    750 hp Speed (diesel):     17.5 knots Speed (electric):  8 knots
Bunkers:   108 tons diesel fuel Range (diesel):  6,500 miles @ 12 knots Range (electric):   80 miles @ 4 knots Crew:   44 men *
Deck gun:   single 3.5 inch ** AA guns:    single 20mm  *** Tubes (fwd):  four Tubes (aft):   one

             The Type VII-B boat carried twelve torpedoes or fourteen mines
   *  Crew complement varied up to perhaps 60 depending on the mission.
  **  Deck guns were removed later in the war.
 ***  Later increased to two individual 20mm plus a single 37mm automatic guns.

                   
                   
                   

Type VII-C German U-Boat

       
The Type VII-C improved over the Type VII-B with the addition of two externally stowed torpedoes and more AA armament.  There were a great many Type VII-C boats built.  They were U-69 through U-72; U-77 through U-82; U-88 through U-98, U-132 through U-136; U-201 through U-212; U-221 through U-232; U-235 through U-458; U-465 through U-486; U-551 through U-790; U-821 through U-840; U-901 through U-1058 and U-1063 through U-1080.

Displacement:    769/871 tons Length:                  218' 3" Beam:                    20' 3" Draft:                   15' 6"
Power (diesel):    2,800 hp Power (electric):    750 hp Speed (diesel):     17 knots Speed (electric):  7 knots
Bunkers:   113 tons diesel fuel Range (diesel):  8,500 miles @ 10 knots
                        or 6,500 miles @ 12 knots
                        or 3,250 miles @ 17 knots
Range (electric):   80 miles @ 2 knots
                          or 30 miles @ 4 knots
Crew:   44 men *
Deck gun:   single 3.5 inch ** AA guns:    two single 20mm  *** Tubes (fwd):  four Tubes (aft):   one

             The Type VII-C boat carried fourteen torpedoes or thirty-nine mines
   *  Crew complement varied up to perhaps 60 depending on the mission.
  **  Deck guns were removed later in the war.
 ***  Later increased to two individual 20mm plus a single 37mm automatic guns.

Snorkels were added to many later in the war.  Some boats, specifically U-441, were outfitted as 'Flak Traps' with two twin mounted 20mm before the conning tower plus two twin mount 20mm abaft the tower as well as the 37mm designed to protect other U-Boats as they transited the Bay of Biscay.
 

                   
                   
                   

Type VII-C41/2 German U-Boat

The Type VII-C41/2 was improved over the Type VII-C primarily with the use of stronger pressure hull for deeper diving.  There were many Type VII-C41/2 boats built.  They were U-1101 through U-1220 and U-1271 through U-1330.

Displacement:    769/871 tons Length:                  220' 3" Beam:                    20' 3" Draft:                   15' 9"
Power (diesel):    2,800 hp Power (electric):    750 hp Speed (diesel):     17 knots Speed (electric):  7 knots
Bunkers:   114 tons diesel fuel Range (diesel):  6,500 miles @ 12 knots Range (electric):   80 miles @ 4 knots Crew:   44 men *
Deck gun:   none AA guns:    two single 20mm  ** Tubes (fwd):  four Tubes (aft):   one

             The Type VII-C boat carried fourteen torpedoes or thirty-nine mines
   *  Crew complement varied up to perhaps 60 depending on the mission.
  **  AA capacity was increased in varying degrees from boat to boat.
 

                   
                   
                   

Type VII-C42 German U-Boat

The Type VII-C42 was even more improved over the Type VII-C41/2 with the use of an even stronger pressure hull for deeper diving, conning towers were armored and there was more AA armament.  There were many Type VII-C42 boats built.  They were U-1091 through U-1100; U-1331 through U-1404; U-1417 through U-1500; U-1801 through U-2110 and U-2301 through U-2320.

Not all were built.  Some were partially built and scrapped incomplete, others were merely contracted for at war's end.

Displacement:    999/1,050 tons Length:                  225' 6" Beam:                    22' 3" Draft:                   16' 3"
Power (diesel):    2,800 hp Power (electric):    750 hp Speed (diesel):     17 knots Speed (electric):  7 knots
Bunkers:   180 tons diesel fuel Range (diesel):  10,000 miles @ 12 knots Range (electric):   80 miles @ 4 knots Crew:   45 men *
Deck gun:   none AA guns:    two single 20mm  ** Tubes (fwd):  four Tubes (aft):   one

             The Type VII-C boat carried fourteen torpedoes or thirty-nine mines
   *  Crew complement varied up to perhaps 60 depending on the mission.
  **  AA capacity was increased in varying degrees from boat to boat.
 

                   
                   
                   

Type VII-D German U-Boat

         
The Type VII-D
was a modified Type VII-C.  With the addition of a thirty-two foot section added to the hull abaft the conning tower with five free-flooding mine shaft, this variant was turned into a minelaying submarine.  Because the boat was 32 feet longer, bunkers and radius were greatly increased but there was loss of speed.  Only six Type VII-D boats were built; U-213 through U-218.
 

Displacement:    965/1,080 tons Length:                  252' 3" Beam:                    21' 0" Draft:                   16' 6"
Power (diesel):    2,800 hp Power (electric):    750 hp Speed (diesel):     16 knots Speed (electric):  7 knots
Bunkers:   170 tons diesel fuel Range (diesel):  8,100 miles @ 12 knots Range (electric):   69 miles @ 4 knots Crew:   44 men *
Deck gun:   none AA guns:    two single 20mm  ** Tubes (fwd):  four Tubes (aft):   one

             The Type VII-C boat carried fourteen torpedoes and fifteen mines or thirty-nine mines
   *  Crew complement varied up to perhaps 60 depending on the mission.
  **  AA capacity was increased in varying degrees from boat to boat.

                   
                   
                   

Type VII-E German U-Boat

The Type VII-E was intended to be a normal Type VII boat but with substantially lighter engines for better speed and longer range.  The development of the new engines suffered considerable delays, therefore the design was cancelled.

                   
                   
                   

Type VII-F German U-Boat

         
The Type VII-F
was a modified Type VII-D.  With the addition of a section added to the hull abaft the conning tower to stow twenty five torpedoes for reloads to Frontboots, this variant was more or less a Type VII supply boat with combat capabilities.  Because the boat was feet longer, bunkers and radius were greatly increased but there was loss of speed.  Only four Type VII-E boats were built; U-1059 through U-1062.

Displacement:    1,084/1,181 tons Length:                  254' 9" Beam:                    24' 0" Draft:                   16' 0"
Power (diesel):    2,800 hp Power (electric):    750 hp Speed (diesel):     17 knots Speed (electric):  8 knots
Bunkers:   199 tons diesel fuel Range (diesel):  9,500 miles @ 12 knots Range (electric):   75 miles @ 4 knots Crew:   46 men *
Deck gun:   none AA guns:    two single 20mm
         plus one 37mm 
**
Tubes (fwd):  four Tubes (aft):   one

             The Type VII-F boat carried fourteen torpedoes plus twenty-five torpedoes as cargo.
   *  Crew complement varied up to perhaps 60 depending on the mission.
  **  AA capacity was increased in varying degrees from boat to boat.

                   
                   
                   

Type VIII German U-Boat

No details are available for this type.  It was never built.

                   
                   
                   


Deepest thanks to our friends at the U-Bootskameradschaft Kiel for allowing us to bring their sacred book containing the names of all 28,863 U-Bootfahrer who were lost in action during World War II here to the USA where we carefully copied all the names of the fallen and list them here on our site.  Ours is the only website in the world that lists all these names.
 

Many thanks to our good friend and Sharkhunters Member since 1987 GEORG HÖGEL (240-LIFE-1987) for all the conning tower emblems used in our monthly KTB Magazine and also here on the pages of our website.  GEORG was Funkmaat (radioman) aboard U-30, the first boat into combat, the first to sink a ship (the liner ATHENIA) and the first into an occupied French port.  When that Skipper (Lemp) took command of U-110, GEORG was one of the former crew to transfer to the new boat under Lemp.  After the war, he was Professor of Art at a major German university.

GEORG HÖGEL

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